November 2017

21

Nov'17

3 Centers of Intelligence | their many uses – Part 2

This blog describes one way that the 3 Centers of Intelligence – Head, Heart and Body – can be useful and practical in developing relationships. Peter O’Hanrahan and I have a new 2-day program titled “Relationships Reimagined” in which we use the 3 Centers of Intelligence as well as type. One premise of the program is that to have conscious relationships, each person in the relationship needs to be as whole and integrated as possible. This means accessing and productively using each of the 3 Centers of Intelligence and using all three in an integrated way. For each Center of Intelligence, there is a fundamental concept which is also an aspiration. Here’s what they are and how each of these move us closer to the possibility of having more fulfilling relationships. Body Center: Grounded Why being grounded matters in fulfilling relationships | Being grounded allows us to be present to ourselves as well as the other person. Activity | Sitting or standing, feel your feet and wiggle your toes. Feel the quality of liquid gold energy there and allow this to move slowly up your calves, thighs, torso, back, neck, arms, and head. Sit or stand with this liquid gold. Keep this quality of somatic presence within you and slowly guide your attention down to your feet and to where your feet touch the ground. Allow the sensation of roots or energy to go from your feet into the ground. Practice this regularly. Heart Center: Empathic Why being empathic matters in fulfilling relationships | Being empathic allows us to feel and express authentic emotions as well as to experience true compassion. Activity | There are many enjoyable ways to open the Heart Center and increase empathy. One way is to listen to music that specifically access the heart – for example, many country western songs, Chopin for those who like classical music. There is also making sounds from the inside out. The sound Om works well for this. Place your hand over your heart, a make the Om sound so that you feel the sound vibrating from you heart. Head Center: Mindful Why being mindful matters in fulfilling relationships | Being mindful allows us to see and value others for who they really are, not for who we imagine them to be. Activity | Sit, be still, and observe your inner workings. Observe your thoughts, but do not engage them. Observe your feelings, but do not ponder them. Observe your body sensations, and just notice them. Stay alert as you do these. Ginger Lapid-Bogda PhD, the author of six best-selling Enneagram-business books, is a speaker, consultant, trainer, and coach. She provides certification programs for professionals around the world who want to bring the Enneagram into organizations with high-impact business applications, and is past-president of the International Enneagram Association. Visit her website: TheEnneagramInBusiness.com. ginger@theenneagraminbusiness.com

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15

Nov'17

Enneagram Limericks by Tom Hattersley

PERFECTIONIST… There once was a One so right About the trivial he would fight Others he would judge His opinions would not budge When he neared all would take flight GIVER… There once a helper Type Two Who thought of only you, you and you Behind her help was pride Self-care she would not abide She wondered when her day off was due PERFORMER… There once was a Three indeed productive With charms oh so seductive He lived for success He liked failure quite less For him approval was superconductive TRAGIC-ROMANTIC… There once was a special Type Four Who everyone else she found a bore She feared rejection So for protection To those who got close she showed the door OBSERVER… There once was a quiet man Type Five So emotionless he seemed barely alive His energy he saved Claims of aloofness he braved While his mind did buzz like a hive DEVIL’S ADVOCATE… There once was a Six not feeling supported Any decision she made would be aborted Others she did not trust Grounding she did lust Her projections of others were distorted EPICURE… There once was a Seven full of innovations Life was fun, frolic and creations Not taking time to think Into trouble he would sink “It could have been worse” were his explanations BOSS… There once was an Eight so bold Who feared of being controlled Others she would protect Some wanted to ring her neck “Be vulnerable” she could not be told MEDIATOR… There once were Nines so serene Away from all conflict they would lean To get them to move Hard it would prove For them all points of view could be seen Tom Hattersley JD is a lawyer, executive coach, HR professional, Enneagram teacher, partner in Pathway Guidance, a Cincinnati-based consulting firm, and senior member of the Enneagram in Business Network. In his spare time, of which he has very little, he writes limericks! pathwayguidance.com tom.hattersley@pathwayguidance.com - Ginger Lapid-Bogda PhD, the author of six best-selling Enneagram-business books, is a speaker, consultant, trainer, and coach. She provides certification programs for professionals around the world who want to bring the Enneagram into organizations with high-impact business applications, and is past-president of the International Enneagram Association. Visit her website: TheEnneagramInBusiness.com ginger@theenneagraminbusiness.com

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08

Nov'17

3 Centers of Intelligence | their many uses – Part 1

The 3 Centers of Intelligence – Head Center, Heart Center and Body Center – form a basis of the 20th century mystic, philosopher and teacher, G. I. Gurdjieff, brought to the Fourth Way teachings and to the Enneagram. This blog, the 1st of 4 in the series on how to use the Centers of Intelligence for personal growth or professional practice, describes a way that Centers of Intelligence can be useful and practical in your coaching practice. In my “Coaching with the Enneagram 1.0 program, participants learn daily, very short centering practices that they can do prior to engaging with their coaching clients. The rational is that if the coach is preoccupied, then being “present” to the client becomes extremely difficult. The reason these are short is because coaches may not have sufficient time between clients to engage in more extended centering work. Each of the following brief centering exercises can be stand-alone practices or they can be done sequentially. In other words, a centering practice aimed at one of the coach’s 3 Centers of Intelligence will more than likely have a centering effect on the other two centers. However, if all 3 Centers get centered, the impact is even stronger. Still Body Center: Use a centered, still body to not be distracted. Use your breath to gently inhale into your whole body, starting through your nostrils and moving downward until your entire body is filled with breath. Gently exhale and repeat slowly three more times. Calm Heart Center: Use breathing to calm and exhale your feelings. Use your breath to gently inhale into your heart area, starting through your nostrils and expanding and containing your breath as it fills your heart chamber. Think of this area as a larger Heart Center cavity from front to back and side to side. Breathe in to expand the space. Gently exhale your feelings so the Heart Center is not cluttered with feelings, and repeat slowly three more times. Clear Head Center: Use your windshield wipers to wipe your thoughts. As you sit for a moment, observe your thoughts without attaching yourself to any of them, just notice them. After a short time, imagine windshield wipers – and let them be of any kind and any rhythm you prefer – simply wipe the thoughts away as you continue to observe your thoughts as they move through your Mental Center. Notice the pattern of your thoughts – that is, the themes of their content as well as the way they both enter and leave your Mental Center. Ginger Lapid-Bogda PhD, the author of six best-selling Enneagram-business books, is a speaker, consultant, trainer, and coach. She provides certification programs for professionals around the world who want to bring the Enneagram into organizations with high-impact business applications, and is past-president of the International Enneagram Association. Visit her website: TheEnneagramInBusiness.com. ginger@theenneagraminbusiness.com

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02

Nov'17

Development | pushing pause

The faster we go, the slower we need to be ~ Peter Senge PhD Pushing the pause button, even if for a second, allows us the space to interrupt our reactive and habitual responses and to make new and more informed, more effective, and more conscious choices. Without the pause, there may or may not be awareness, but awareness and choice are not the same. Here are some simple ways individuals of each Enneagram type can push pause. Enneagram Ones Enneagram Ones are known for their ability to form fast opinions and create quite rapid detailed plans using their gut instincts first and then their minds. To push pause, breathe into your Heart Center to ask yourself this: What am I feeling right now? Enneagram Twos Enneagram Twos move very quickly – that is, without pushing pause – when they care about someone or a group in distress, even if they may not even know the individuals or groups involved directly. Their heart gets activated, then their behavior takes over. To push pause, go into your Head Center and ask yourself this: Is what I am about to do what I really want to do and why? Is it good for me? Is it truly good for them? Enneagram Threes Enneagram Threes are well known to move to action quickly. A goal they want to achieve emits a quick and efficient plan. An interpersonal response they like emits more of the same from them. A response they don’t like emits a quick alteration of behavior. It happens quickly and simply. They think they want or don’t want something – which is an emotion-based response – and their mind immediately wraps into a structure for how to achieve their desired outcome. To push pause, go into your Body Center and make your intention to fill it entirely, feeling your body from your toes to your nose. Enneagram Fours Enneagram Fours respond emotionally very quickly with almost no pause. They may withdraw, they may freeze or they may say something or act quickly – sometimes with later regret and sometimes not – and all comes from the Heart Center. To push pause, pause your heart, then move into your body as fully as you can, and then ask your Mental Center: What other choices do I have in this situation? Enneagram Fives Enneagram Fives may appear as if they are on a long pause, but don’t mistake their silence or thoughtfulness for a pause. There is often an active reaction under this stillness, even if it is not externally expressed. To push pause, breathe into your whole body, starting with you Head Center, then allowing that breath to move throughout and fill you entirely in a soft way. Enneagram Sixes Enneagram Sixes are known to be a quick reactive Enneagram type, moving into mental processing, what-if thinking, and scenario planning. Counter-phobic Sixes also move into action very quickly, as a way to prove their strength and courage. To push pause, some Sixes – particularly the self-preserving subtype and social subtype Sixes– need to go out in nature, take a walk and be in their bodies. 1-1 Sixes need to go into their hearts and ask this question: What do I feel right now? Enneagram Sevens Enneagram Sevens respond so quickly externally, unless they are highly introverted, but even introverted Sevens are thinking in lightening-fast time. To push pause, the key is through the breath. Sevens are often breathless because they breathe so quickly and shallowly. So slow down your breathing and breathe more deeply. Enneagram Eights Enneagram Eights are among the fastest to take action quickly – for example, when they are excited or anxious, or angry or sad or feeling vulnerable or…. To push pause takes will and determination since the Eight’s call to action is so rapid. Change the way you perceive pause; see it as allowing more choice; define it as being receptive to even more possibility; see it as a challenge for yourself, a challenge you are strong enough and intentional enough to meet. Then, choose pause. Enneagram Nines Enneagram Nines may appear to be on pause mode due to their easy-going, nothing-bothers-me manner. Inside is a different matter. Internally, Nines may be churning about something or they may be defusing their attention and fogging out rather than being alert. True pause mode is highly alert and, at the same time, highly receptive. To push pause, re-inhabit all of your body from the ground up through every limb and, your torso and head. When you do this, you will be in pure pause. Ginger Lapid-Bogda PhD, the author of six best-selling Enneagram-business books, is a speaker, consultant, trainer, and coach. She provides certification programs for professionals around the world who want to bring the Enneagram into organizations with high-impact business applications, and is past-president of the International Enneagram Association. Visit her website: TheEnneagramInBusiness.com. ginger@theenneagraminbusiness.com

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