January 2018

29

Jan'18

Teaching the Enneagram in organizations | 4 key areas

  I often get asked what are the most important areas for people wishing to train the Enneagram in organizations. To that end, here is a list of key areas: Positioning the Enneagram Trainers need to be able to position the Enneagram for clients so that their clients understand how the Enneagram supports their professional, team, and organizational needs and goals. There are many ways to position the Enneagram for clients: (1) Emotional Intelligence (EQ) since EQ is the strongest predictor of success in every occupation and industry around the world; (2) referring other organizations who have been using the Enneagram effectively; and (3) matching the business application of the Enneagram to the team’s or organization’s most important needs. When matching the Enneagram’s applications to client needs, make sure you do this in all your training sessions, even the first one. Top quality knowledge and skills Trainers need to have a strong knowledge base, excellent professional skills, and compelling personal qualities to be effective conveyers of the Enneagram. Before any application of the Enneagram, trainers must teach the Enneagram system effectively and guide participants in the accurate discovery of their Enneagram types. Typing tests are not sufficient; trainers must understand all 9 types well and be well-versed in helping participants distinguish between types that may superficially appear similar or engage in similar behaviors but for very different reasons. Trainers also need to understand how organizations work and organizational behavior, just as they need to be well-versed in the particular Enneagram topics or business applications they teach. In addition, trainers need to have top-quality professional skills such as presentation, learning design, and facilitation, and they need compelling personal qualities – confidence, clarity, and authenticity – so that participants want to learn from them and they are excellent role models of “walking the talk” and are clearly using the Enneagram for their own development. Engaging and effective activities Trainers must have a robust tool-kit of great activities that both enable participants to learn and engage them at the same time. In most organizations everywhere in the world, participants expect stimulation and interaction rather than to be passive learners through an abundance of lectures. Variety, engagement and horizontal and vertical learning are the critical attributes of an effective Enneagram training program, whether it lasts 4 hours or 4 days. Variety refers to not using the same structure for each topic – for example, a mini-lecture and then type group discussions and reports. This becomes repetitive and boring. Engagement means that participants want to be actively involved with the learning activities because they are smart, well-conceived and stimulating. Horizontal learning refers to learning new skills. In organizations especially, participants want and companies expect skill development. Vertical development means to go deeply into a topic area so that there is the potential for lasting and transformational learning. Continuous personal and professional development Trainers who use the Enneagram for their own personal and professional development make better trainers. They know the system better, are better role models, have more credibility, are more effective interacting with others, and are more convincing champions of using the system. The extent of a trainer’s personal and professional development shows every time they teach the Enneagram. Do they present the 9 types in an accurate, balanced, and respectful way, or do they have issue with certain types that become obvious when describing them? Do trainers have compelling and insightful stories about each type to share in their programs, or is their repertoire limited? Do they know how to answer most questions raised accurately and convincingly, or do they draw a blank or make up information? Do trainers know what they don’t know as well as what they do know so that they are confident to say, “I don’t know; let me think about that?” Do they have enough confidence and skill to draw out the answers from participants whenever possible instead of answering most questions themselves? If a session went well or if it didn’t, do trainers have enough self-mastery to assess the situation accurately and decipher what they did or didn’t do well and what they can change in the future? This is why a commitment to continuous personal and professional development is so important. Ginger Lapid-Bogda PhD, the author of six best-selling Enneagram-business books, is a speaker, consultant, trainer, and coach. She provides certification programs for professionals around the world who want to bring the Enneagram into organizations with high-impact business applications, and is past-president of the International Enneagram Association. Visit her website: TheEnneagramInBusiness.com. ginger@theenneagraminbusiness.com

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24

Jan'18

3 important Enneagram training questions and answers

For this blog, I started with some answers I believe are important in both teaching the Enneagram myself as well as teaching others to teach the system and watching them do so. As a result, I pose these three questions to you, each with five answers to choose from among so you can think about it. And then you get the answers! Question 1 | Which of the following is the least important for trainers to know in-depth before they teach the Enneagram? 1. The 9 types, including worldviews, and thought, feeling and behavioral patterns 2. The use of wings and arrow lines 3. The 27 Enneagram subtypes 4. The history of the Enneagram 5. Skill development with the Enneagram Answer  | The history of the Enneagram This is the least important for trainers to know in-depth. While it is important to know and share that the Enneagram has a long and ancient history, no one is really sure of its exact origins. Try to not spend too much time on this topic, as doing so may lead to unintentionally giving inaccurate information to participants. In addition, most people in organizations only want to know that it has a rich history; they are less interested in prolonged information about its history and more interested in how they can use it. Question 2 | Which of the following is the most important factor for trainers to know before they teach the Enneagram? 1. The physical attributes associated with type 2. Famous people of each type 3. Their own Enneagram type 4. Short stories about each type 5. The types of the organization’s leaders Answer  | Their own Enneagram type This is the most important factor among those listed. When trainers do not know their own types – or have mistyped themselves – it is highly likely they will be teaching some or most of the types inaccurately. When trainers don’t know their own type at all, they are challenged to convince participants that the Enneagram is a viable and usable system. I’ve heard some trainers admit they don’t know their type when they are teaching, and this gives the impression that it is either too hard or it doesn’t matter. In addition, participants look to trainers as good examples of the types the trainers say they represent. As a result, a mistyped trainer will unintentionally cause confusion about type among participants. Question 3 | Which of the following factors does not accurately explain why the self-mastery of trainers is crucial when teaching the Enneagram? 1. Credibility | rationale | Trainers need to demonstrate high levels of self-mastery so they “walk-the-talk” 2. Interpersonal skills | rationale | Trainers with lower self-mastery may not interact effectively with participants 3. Training skills | rationale | Trainers with lower self-mastery can’t be good trainers, no matter what the content 4. Psychological spill-over | rationale | Trainers with insufficient self-mastery can unconsciously communicate negative information about types with which they have issues 5. Development information | rationale | Trainers with lower self-mastery will have more difficulty effectively teaching the development paths for the 9 types Answer  | Training skills | rationale | Trainers with lower self-mastery can’t be good trainers, no matter what the content Actually, a person can have strong training design and training execution skills – lecturing, facilitating, etc. – and in areas other than the Enneagram or similar deep development systems, they may do well. This is particularly true if the training has a great deal of structured content and the trainer has a great deal of experience training a particular program. Ginger Lapid-Bogda PhD, the author of six best-selling Enneagram-business books, is a speaker, consultant, trainer, and coach. She provides certification programs for professionals around the world who want to bring the Enneagram into organizations with high-impact business applications, and is past-president of the International Enneagram Association. Visit her website: TheEnneagramInBusiness.com. ginger@theenneagraminbusiness.com

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16

Jan'18

Ask Siri | a 6 spiritual experience

My name is Teresa and I am a self-preservation 6. And as is expected, having doubts about anything is something that follows me. My everyday challenge is always to search for more confidence in myself, in others and also in the universe. And I am projecting that the same happens to my colleagues who are type 6! Some months ago, I had an unforgettable experience, some unexpected help for me and all type 6’s – that is, to believe that things happen without our control and that having doubts can be just a waste of your time. It was a moment that I will remember from now on and all my life. I went from Brazil to Ireland to attend the new Ginger’s program “Being in Essence,” (which is one I really recommend). In the middle of the program, we were doing an activity in type groups. We were having a conversation about how a piece of Rumi’s poem we had in our booklets was related to our type. On the table, we had our booklets, some colored pencils and my cell phone (iPhone). During the activity, I realized that I had a doubt and said this to my sister type 6 colleague, Mary: “I have a doubt… I really don’t know if it is a translation doubt Portuguese is my native language or if it is something about the meaning of the poem.” I noticed Mary was about to answer me, but before she started talking, SIRI, from my iPhone, answered this instead: “It’s not a problem!” What!!!! How can that happen? I didn’t touch my cell phone!! Mary and I laughed and laughed. It looked like the Universe sending us a message. This answer from SIRI was and is what type 6s need to remember every day! Most of our doubts are in our heads and are not exactly a problem! There are a lot of alternatives to managing each situation we have to face, and we don't need to make things worse. So pay attention! If you, type 6, have any doubt about anything, ask yourself if the doubt is really important. If not, remember SIRI’s advice. Many times, “It’s not a problem!” Teresa Salles is a business consultant and Associate Member of the EIBN (Enneagram in Business Network) from Brazil. You can reach her at Teresa.salles@tecsconsultoria.com.br - Ginger Lapid-Bogda PhD, the author of six best-selling Enneagram-business books, is a speaker, consultant, trainer, and coach. She provides certification programs for professionals around the world who want to bring the Enneagram into organizations with high-impact business applications, and is past-president of the International Enneagram Association. Visit her website: TheEnneagramInBusiness.com. ginger@theenneagraminbusiness.com

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