March 2018

27

Mar'18

Enneagram typing | most common methods for teaching type

There are many ways to teach the Enneagram system and to help others find their Enneagram type accurately. However, any method used requires the person teaching the Enneagram to know the Enneagram themselves in depth. MOST COMMON METHODS FOR TEACHING THE ENNEAGRAM The most common methods include the following, accompanied by the pros and cons of each method: lectures, typing cards, interactive activities, type panels, typing interviews, and tests. These approaches are not mutually exclusive – that is, most Enneagram teachers, trainers and coaches use more than one approach, which is highly beneficial. Lectures Lectures are effective if the trainer (1) knows the Enneagram well, (2) can explain the system and types to newcomers in a clear and accurate way, and (3) uses excellent teaching aids, such as PowerPoint slides, to support learning. The issue when teaching through lecture only is that it requires that the trainer be an outstanding presenter who can maintain a level of excellence for an extended period of time – for example, 4-8 hours. In addition, a lecture-only method requires that participants are capable of absorbing material in a primarily auditory way; the normal attention span for lecture is somewhere between 15-30 minutes. In addition, lecture-only teaching offers only minimal assurance that a majority of the participants can identify their types accurately because there is little opportunity to verify type. Typing cards Typing cards are an effective typing method, and we provide two different sets of cards by which to do this: Enneagram Typing Cards and The Enneagram Discovery Deck, both of which are described below. Typing cards do not always give a definitive answer to type, but they do provide people with a kinesthetic way to consider certain types as more likely and to eliminate others. Other forms of typing cards are also available from other providers. With both of my typing card options, people sort the cards into Yes, No, Maybe, then rank order their Yes pile from most Yes to least. Most people get their actual type in their Yes pile, often as #1 or #2. Most commonly, people find their type as their #1 card or among the top three cards. For this reason, and just as with all typing methods, the trainer or coach needs to know the Enneagram system and all nine types well enough to help the client differentiate between types because of "look-alikes," wings and arrows of a type, subtypes, and other factors. Interactive activities Interactive activities not only engage people, they give people a first-hand experience of themselves. This matters in typing because how people think they are – also called "self-report" – may not be how they actually are. This can be true even for people who are relatively self-aware. Examples might include a somatic exercise where participants are directed to move in space from each Center of Intelligence – Head, Heart, and Body – and to then understand the degree of access they have to each Center. Other exercises would need to follow – for example, belief systems of each type posted on a wall, with participants then moving to the belief system that most aligns with how they think. And then more exercises would need to be carefully stacked upon these. To construct these kinds of interactive activities and make them effective in helping people identify type, it takes a very savvy instructional designer with deep knowledge of the Enneagram and top-notch facilitation skills to be able to process the exercises. Type panels Enneagram type panels are a group of people of the same type – usually 3-6 people – interviewed by a trained Enneagram facilitator who asks the panelists a set of exploratory questions related to that particular type. The facilitator’s questions usually start out as general ones, after which the facilitator asks relevant probing questions related to the panelist’s response. The audience learns about the types based on the "stories" of the panelists and tries to assess which type panel might be most similar to them. Type panels are an excellent way to teach Enneagram type, but the conditions need to be ideal. First, panels take time – at least 30-45 minutes per type panel – and because there are nine panels, teaching type by this method can take a minimum of two days. Second, effective type panels require that the panelists already know their type accurately. This is not possible if all participants are new to the Enneagram. Third, the group size must be large enough to get 27 panelists, three individuals of each type at a minimum. Finally, the panel facilitator must be well-trained and highly experienced in facilitating panels, as well as know the Enneagram in depth; otherwise, the panel facilitator will not know the best initial open-ended questions to ask each type panel or how to probe for more detailed and illuminating answers. Typing interviews Typing interviews involve an experienced Enneagram teacher interviewing another person and utilize specific, systematic questions that illuminate type. Interviews take between 45 minutes and 1.5 hours and may use questions that start with type 1 and end with type 9, or the questions may first focus on the three Centers of Intelligence, asking questions to identify the person’s primary Center – Head, Heart or Body – and then move to which of the three types in this Center is the best fit. These are just two examples of interviewing formats; there are many others. Because typing interviews are highly personalized, they can be very effective if the interviewer knows the Enneagram well, is adept at developing typing questions, and is an excellent listener. Interviewers need to listen not just for the words used, but also pay attention to the other person’s body language, sentence construction, and more. I also use typing interviews in group settings, but I keep the questions non-invasive and seek to illuminate patterns rather than deeper psychological information. Enneagram tests There are five main Enneagram tests currently available, all of which are useful and have limitations when used in Enneagram typing. All five Enneagram tests also have validation and reliability studies to support their levels of accuracy, although they use different measures for this. Most of the tests give percentages indicating the probability that the test-taker’s highest score is his or her type. Most tests also report the test-taker’s next highest scores and the percentage or likelihood that the second or third highest scoring types are the test-taker’s actual type. The fact that typing-test results are typically not stated as 100% definitive shows integrity on the part of the test creators. If all Enneagram test-takers were highly self-aware, typing-test results would become increasingly more accurate. If Enneagram type were personality or character, measuring these qualities and assessing individuals against them would be much easier. But because Enneagram type is Ego structure, a far more complex phenomenon, Enneagram typing instruments are complex to construct. This also means that if you are an Enneagram teacher, trainer or coach who relies solely on the test to determine type and you don’t know the system and types well yourself, you won’t be able to help another person sort out the test results for accuracy. In addition, a test-taker, even if the type score is accurate, only learns his or her type, not the other eight types or the system as a whole. For these reasons, it is best to not rely solely (emphasis on the word solely) on tests for accurate typing. The Art of Typing | This blog is an adapted excerpt from Ginger Lapid-Bogda’s new book, The Art of Typing: Powerful Tools for Enneagram Typing. In it, you’ll find infographics of the 9 different Enneagram Ego- structures, insightful questions and delightful illustrations to help differentiate between types, and other important factors to consider: overlays such as family, culture and gender, Centers of Intelligence, wings and arrows, Enneagram subtypes, and more. Ginger Lapid-Bogda PhD, the author of seven best-selling Enneagram-business books, is a speaker, consultant, trainer, and coach. She provides certification programs for professionals around the world who want to bring the Enneagram into organizations with high-impact business applications, and is past-president of the International Enneagram Association. Visit her website: TheEnneagramInBusiness.com. ginger@theenneagraminbusiness.com

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20

Mar'18

Enneagram typing | why is accurate typing so important?

One of the most challenging and important aspects of working with the Enneagram in any setting is “getting type right.” Here is why this matters so much. Discovering type supports accurate self-observation Mistyped people pay attention to the wrong things Example: A type 6 who has been mistyped as a type 7 might self-observe for how his or her mind wanders or distracts when anxious, but may not notice the true source of the mind in constant action nor the pattern of thoughts. For type 7, the mind is in perpetual motion due to a number of factors: excitement, boredom and a need to feel stimulated, fear of limitation or restriction, sadness, and more. For type 6, the mind becomes activated through fear of all kinds and the mind creates anticipatory, worst case or alternative problem solving scenarios. The stimulus for the mental patterns, the patterns themselves and the source of this thinking is very different. Deep psychological and spiritual development is directly connected to type Wrong type means the wrong development path Example: A type 5 who has been mistyped as a type 4 might come to believe that the psychological and spiritual work is to reduce being envious of others – that is, to minimize or relax the continuous comparisons of self to others – and to find more emotional balance. What has just been described is the journey of type 4. However, the deeper work for type 5s is fuller access to and present-time expression of emotional and somatic experience and to then integrate all three Centers of Intelligence rather than separating them from one another. Relationships with others improve from knowing your type and theirs Mistyped people misunderstand or misinterpret their own impact on others Example: 2s who have been mistyped as a type 8 will misperceive their impact on others as believing that they are too angry or intense for other people – which could describe the impact of many type 8s – and not recognize that type 2s can come across as too invasive or as having an excessive, if masked, need to be liked. Almost all applications of the Enneagram require accurate type identification Improving leadership style, teams, interactions, conflict and coaching, just as examples, all require that people know their types Example: 1s who have been mistyped as a type 7 can misunderstand their own leadership style as one that is innovative, thinking beyond the boundaries of most other leaders, when the 1’s leadership is far more systematic, organized, and focused on timely deliverables. People need to have themselves typed accurately to teach type to others Minimally, mistyped teachers typically teach two types incorrectly: the teacher’s real type and the type they think they are Example: Even when teachers describe the types accurately through verbal language, when they share their own type and personal examples, the way in which they share these – for example, their speaking style, voice tone, and body language – are inconsistent with the explanation and more closely match the style they actually are, not the type they think they are. People learning the Enneagram pay less attention to the actual content and more attention to how something is communicated, thus causing type confusion. As a case in point, a type 3 who has been mistyped as a 9 may (accurately) describe the type 9 speaking style as sequential storytelling – that is, starting at the very beginning and telling a story in sequence until the end – but since the person is a type 3 mistakenly thinking he or she is a type 9, he or she may tell no stories or tell very short ones. The message about type-based speaking style, in this case, is incongruent with the person presenting the information. The Art of Typing | This blog is an adapted excerpt from Ginger Lapid-Bogda’s new book, The Art of Typing: Powerful Tools for Enneagram Typing. In it, you’ll find infographics of the 9 different Enneagram Ego- structures, insightful questions and delightful illustrations to help differentiate between types, and other important factors to consider: overlays such as family, culture and gender, Centers of Intelligence, wings and arrows, Enneagram subtypes, and more. Ginger Lapid-Bogda PhD, the author of seven best-selling Enneagram-business books, is a speaker, consultant, trainer, and coach. She provides certification programs for professionals around the world who want to bring the Enneagram into organizations with high-impact business applications, and is past-president of the International Enneagram Association. Visit her website: TheEnneagramInBusiness.com. ginger@theenneagraminbusiness.com

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13

Mar'18

Hello world!

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12

Mar'18

How to be a great coaching client part 3 | body center clients 8, 9 and 1

To accelerate the positive impact of your coaching success, clients of each type can use the coaching experience and their reactions to coaching itself as a guide for their development. This 3rd blog in the three-part series offers possibilities for clients in the Body Center of Intelligence, types 8, 9 and 1. Eight clients Be patient with, and learn patience from, the coaching experience. Action may not occur immediately, and if it does, it may not be the wisest course to take. Be willing to share your softer, more vulnerable side with your coach. Make a commitment to this on an ongoing basis, constantly working on your ability to be more self-disclosing. This will help you both become more comfortable doing so and recognize that real strength comes from being fully human. This includes feeling strong and also allowing yourself to feel vulnerable. Make sure you select a coach who will not feel intimidated by you, but remember that personal strength comes in many forms. Be wary of testing your coach at the earliest stages of coaching. Nine clients Select a coach who will help you stay focused on the central agenda of the coaching. If you feel angry or frustrated at any time during the coaching or if you have strongly held opinions about a topic being discussed, take the risk to discuss these thoughts and feelings with your coach. This is excellent practice for behavior that you will want to incorporate in arenas outside of coaching. Work with your coach to put clear and rigorous time frames and deliverable outputs on your coaching goals. Both you and your coach can then hold each other accountable for delivering the results you say you want. One clients If you become discouraged by some of the feedback you receive, remember that reactivity to perceived criticism is a growth area for most Ones. Be watchful when you become self-critical or engage in defensive behavior in order to keep yourself from feeling you have done something terribly wrong; allow the coach to help you with this should it occur. Keep in mind that the time spent in coaching sessions will be of great benefit, but it does take time to see longer-lasting results. You are very likely to experience positive results at various stages of coaching, but the more far-reaching impact may not occur until the end of the coaching process. Let your coach take equal responsibility for the success of the coaching, rather than your feeling you are responsible for the outcomes; when you share the responsibility, you can relax more and share control of the coaching with the coach. Ginger Lapid-Bogda PhD, the author of seven best-selling Enneagram-business books, is a speaker, consultant, trainer, and coach. She provides certification programs for professionals around the world who want to bring the Enneagram into organizations with high-impact business applications, and is past-president of the International Enneagram Association. Visit her website: TheEnneagramInBusiness.com. ginger@theenneagraminbusiness.com

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06

Mar'18

Development | giving feedback

We all need people who will give us feedback. That’s how we improve. ~ Bill Gates Here are some tips for keeping your own Enneagram type tendencies from interfering with your feedback delivery, especially when giving negative or constructive feedback. ONES Utilize your skill at being very specific, but avoid being too detailed or picking on too many small items | Keep your capacity to generate ways someone else can improve, but work very hard to control your use of explicitly or implicitly judgmental language | Maintain your truthfulness, but resolve any residual anger or resentment prior to having the feedback conversation so your feelings do not show through your body language TWOS Maintain your positive regard for the other person, but not at the expense of avoiding the negative information | Consider the other person’s feelings, but do not “fog over” the issues to keep the feedback recipient from feeling bad | Pay attention to the recipient’s reaction, but take neither a positive nor a negative response personally | Maintain your perceptiveness, but remind yourself that your insights may not be accurate, especially when you are angry THREES Maintain your focus, but also allow room for feelings, particularly those of the other person | Be clear and honest, and remember to be gentle | Keep focused on the desired result rather than using too many small examples that may derail your main point | Be patient FOURS Be empathic, but be careful not to get your own feelings so involved that you presume to know what the other person feels | Maintain your truthfulness, but add a positive tone and include positive comments | Pay attention to the other person, but try to match his/her mood or energy rather than trying to get the person to match yours FIVES Keep your precision, but do not be so concise that the other person does not understand what you are saying | Continue to rigorously think through your approach, but be careful not to overload the feedback recipient with information | Keep being clear about your task, but also invite an emotional response from the other person SIXES Planning is crucial, but work to calm yourself before the feedback meeting | Details are important, but keep sight of the big picture; thinking about possible scenarios is helpful, but try to balance the negative possibilities with positive ones | Honor your insights, but avoid assuming that your thoughts are accurate; treat them as hypotheses, and seek the answers from the feedback recipient SEVENS Maintain your optimism, but be careful not to let that obscure what the feedback recipient needs to hear | Use your ability to provide context and perspective carefully so that the central issue does not get lost | Do bring in related information, but keep your focus so that the feedback recipient does not get sidetracked EIGHTS Maintain your ability to keep focused on the key points, but do so in a receptive way | Have some ideas about what to do, but allow the feedback recipient to make the first suggestions | Consider in advance what you want to say | Keep your skill in steering your full attention to the task, but downplay your energy level so the other person does not feel overwhelmed | Smiling, making easy jokes, and waiting patiently for a response are helpful | Retain your truthfulness, but include a positive component NINES Keep creating rapport and maintain your kindness, but also deliver a clear message | Retain your capacity to understand a situation from many viewpoints, but stay focused on your main point | Think of other issues that may be related, and save them for further discussion; try to keep your feedback focused on one issue at a time Ginger Lapid-Bogda PhD, the author of seven best-selling Enneagram-business books, is a speaker, consultant, trainer, and coach. She provides certification programs for professionals around the world who want to bring the Enneagram into organizations with high-impact business applications, and is past-president of the International Enneagram Association. Visit her website: TheEnneagramInBusiness.com. ginger@theenneagraminbusiness.com

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