April 2018

24

Apr'18

What is Enneagram type | Part 2

WHAT IS EGO STRUCTURE? The term "Ego" has many definitions, but the one applicable to the Enneagram derives from both Freudian psychology and spiritual traditions. The nine Enneagram types represent nine distinct aspects of the human Ego. The Psychological Ego From the Freudian psychological perspective, the Ego navigates between the Id, or unconscious impulses, and the Superego, the internalized societal rules and norms that hold us in check. In the Freudian sense, the Ego is the self – often defined as the rational self – in daily life. It is the individual’s inner architecture, as well as how he or she interacts with and responds to the external world. The function of the Ego is even more intricate; it provides individuals with both continuity and consistency by providing a personal point of reference that connects events of the past with experiences in the present and possibilities or probabilities of the future. The past is accessed through subjective memories, the future through anticipation and imagination, with the Ego linking all three elements together. A person’s Ego-ideal is part of the Ego, but refers specifically to how a person most wants to perceive him- or herself, even if true reality doesn’t quite match. The Spiritual Meaning of Ego The Ego, from a spiritual perspective, is the over-identification with what you perceive as self and a specific over-identification with your thoughts and thought patterns, emotions and emotional response patterns, and behavior and behavioral patterns. Another word for identification is attachment, and this refers to being attached to your self-perception, your thoughts, feelings and behaviors as if these are all of who you are when, in fact, your truest self or essence goes far deeper. From a spiritual perspective, the path to greater consciousness is to increasingly dis-identify from or lessen one’s attachment to the Ego. Part 3 blog in this series illustrates the specific components of Ego-structure. The Art of Typing | This blog is an adapted excerpt from Ginger Lapid-Bogda’s new book, The Art of Typing: Powerful Tools for Enneagram Typing. In it, you’ll find infographics of the 9 different Enneagram Ego- structures, insightful questions and delightful illustrations to help differentiate between types, and other important factors to consider: overlays such as family, culture and gender, Centers of Intelligence, wings and arrows, Enneagram subtypes, and more. Ginger Lapid-Bogda PhD, the author of seven best-selling Enneagram-business books, is a speaker, consultant, trainer, and coach. She provides certification programs for professionals around the world who want to bring the Enneagram into organizations with high-impact business applications, and is past-president of the International Enneagram Association. Visit her website: TheEnneagramInBusiness.com. ginger@theenneagraminbusiness.com

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17

Apr'18

What is Enneagram type | Part 1

IS THE ENNEAGRAM PERSONALITY, CHARACTER OR EGO STRUCTURE? The Enneagram, a profound way of understanding people from all cultures, describes the nine fundamental architectures of human beings. Although the Enneagram is often referred to as a personality system, it is far more than that. The Enneagram is also more than character structure. Both personality and character refer to persistent features of human behavior; the nine Enneagram types represent nine distinct aspects of the human Ego. What is personality? Personality exists in the domain of empirical psychology – that is, research and theory based in the field of applied psychology – and as such, personality represents a set of traits and behaviors capable of being measured. For example, traits and behaviors such as introversion, ambition, agreeableness and sociability can be both observed and, with some degree of objectivity, measured. The nine Enneagram types are not nine sets of distinct traits or behaviors. In fact, several Enneagram types may have some similar traits and behaviors – for example, being hardworking or being sociable-relational – but the particular ways in which they demonstrate these traits and, more importantly, the motivations driving these traits are categorically different. What is character structure? Character structure refers to aspects of a person that go deeper than personality and typically involves qualities to which we assign positive or negative values – for example, kind or cruel, honest or dishonest, having integrity or being deceptive. Character falls more into the domain of philosophy, qualities of the inner life that have a moral component and are also more subjective and, therefore, harder to measure. The Enneagram is closer to character structure than personality, but the Enneagram types are not character in the sense described above. In general, each Enneagram type has positive and negative qualities. However, positive and negative qualities do not mean good or bad in a moral sense; they are simply aspects of a person that they and others may like or dislike or that support or hinder them. In addition, the positive and negative characteristics have specific meanings related to that type; the meaning of the characteristics can only be accurately understood in the entire construct for that type. As an example, Enneagram 3s are described as "deceitful," but this does not mean that they chronically lie or that they are more deceptive than the other Enneagram types. Deceit, in this context, refers to how Enneagram 3s hide parts of themselves from themselves, as well as others, and that these hidden parts are qualities that do not conform to the 3’s self-image as a successful, competent, and capable person. Taken in context, "deceit" for 3s is more about self-deception or not being honest with oneself, although it does impact what they share with others. Part 2 blog in this series focuses on what exactly is Ego-structure from both a psychological and spiritual perspective. The Art of Typing | This blog is an adapted excerpt from Ginger Lapid-Bogda’s new book, The Art of Typing: Powerful Tools for Enneagram Typing. In it, you’ll find infographics of the 9 different Enneagram Ego- structures, insightful questions and delightful illustrations to help differentiate between types, and other important factors to consider: overlays such as family, culture and gender, Centers of Intelligence, wings and arrows, Enneagram subtypes, and more. Ginger Lapid-Bogda PhD, the author of seven best-selling Enneagram-business books, is a speaker, consultant, trainer, and coach. She provides certification programs for professionals around the world who want to bring the Enneagram into organizations with high-impact business applications, and is past-president of the International Enneagram Association. Visit her website: TheEnneagramInBusiness.com. ginger@theenneagraminbusiness.com

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09

Apr'18

Enneagram typing | family and culture overlays

In discovering our Enneagram types, there can often be overlays on top of our core type, family overlays and culture overlays among them. Hopefully, this blog helps to clarify some of the confusion. Family overlays There are many overlay factors that can influence a person’s self-perception, as well as how they may appear on the outside in terms of behavior, appearance, and even their style of verbal or non-verbal behavior. Whether or not a family overlay is present depends on the degree to which an authority figure in the home had a pervasive influence on the family, not whether an authority figure of a certain type was present in the family. A dominant authority figure includes mothers, fathers, grandparents, and even older siblings. When this occurs, most, if not all, of the children in the family will have the same type overlay. For example, if a type 1 family overlay exists, the children tend to be more perfectionistic, more critical, or more rule oriented than they might be normally. A type 2 overlay often creates a family system in which the offspring focus more on others than themselves, tend to give more gifts or feel guilty when doing things for themselves. A type 3 overlay might create siblings who are highly achievement-oriented and who feel they must constantly excel. A type 4 overlay in a family could create a cadre of aesthetically-oriented children or ones who are more sensitive and deeper than they might be normally. For a type 5 overlay, the family system might be cooler – for example, not-sharing of emotions readily – and more intellectual and private. For type 6, the family overlay depends on the parental subtype, but in general, this family overlay tends to be one in which children raise doubts more frequently – both internally and externally directed – and do more contingency planning. A type 7 family overlay influences the offspring to be more upbeat and interactive or at least believe that they should be this way. Type 8 overlays often generate families where the children present themselves as tougher or stronger than they actually are. Type 9 family overlays usually have children who are conflict averse, have more challenges expressing their anger, but who are also more easy-going and try to unite people. Culture overlays Not every country or culture has an easily identifiable Enneagram type or only one type, but some do such as France (type 4, likely a one-to-one subtype 4), Canada (type 9), and the US (type 3, likely a social subtype 3). What does this mean in terms of typing? With many French people having a type 4 cultural overlay, they will tend toward the aesthetic and the symbolic, as well as be likely to engage in deep meaningful conversations. Think of all the French artists over the centuries, the abundance of art galleries, and the French past-time of having long conversations in sidewalk cafes, weather permitting. Without understanding French culture, people from France can get mistyped as 4s. Canada (type 9) is known as one of the more inclusive of countries. Most Canadians are relatively easy-going and tend to get along well with other people, just like 9s. The US is made up of many subcultures – for example, Texas is more type 8-like and Maine is more type 5-like – but most people from the US have a type 3 overlay. In the US culture, Enneagram 3s get especially rewarded and the other eight Enneagram types tend to have a more short-term results orientation than they might have normally. Without understanding French, Canadian, and US cultures, people from these countries can get mistyped as 4s, 9s or 3s, respectively. The Art of Typing | This blog is an adapted excerpt from Ginger Lapid-Bogda’s new book, The Art of Typing: Powerful Tools for Enneagram Typing. In it, you’ll find infographics of the 9 different Enneagram Ego- structures, insightful questions and delightful illustrations to help differentiate between types, and other important factors to consider: overlays such as family, culture and gender, Centers of Intelligence, wings and arrows, Enneagram subtypes, and more. Ginger Lapid-Bogda PhD, the author of seven best-selling Enneagram-business books, is a speaker, consultant, trainer, and coach. She provides certification programs for professionals around the world who want to bring the Enneagram into organizations with high-impact business applications, and is past-president of the International Enneagram Association. Visit her website: TheEnneagramInBusiness.com. ginger@theenneagraminbusiness.com

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02

Apr'18

Development | truthfulness

Three things cannot be long hidden: the sun, the moon, and the truth. ~ Buddha Some say the truth will set you free. Others believe that truth is relative, depending on one’s point of view and perspective. Or, is the truth like layers of an onion where different dimensions of the truth must be peeled away to get at the essential truth? The enneagram provides insights into how people of each enneatype can get closer to the truth; one of these ways involves working with each type’s primary defense mechanism, a defensive posture that hides our truth from ourselves. ONES When Ones feel anxious about their thoughts, feelings, or behaviors, they unconsciously revert to reaction formation, a defensive posture where they act 180° differently from what they, in truth, feel and think. For example, they may feel very hurt or angry at a person or situation, but then act as if they feel positively toward the individual or event and most often don’t recognize this contradictory response. Hint: Pay attention to your true feelings; don’t submerge them in an effort to be a “good” person. TWOS When Twos feel anxious about their thoughts, feelings, or behaviors, they unconsciously revert to repression, a defensive posture where they push their true feelings down to such a degree that their either don’t know what they are feeling or think they are having a mild emotional reaction rather than a grave one. The result is that these feelings then build up and eventually explode, much to the chagrin of the Two and to the surprise of those on the receiving end. Hint: Breathe into your whole body, fully and regularly, not primarily into your heart area only, and ask yourself this as you breathe: What am I truly feeling right now? THREES When Threes feel anxious about their thoughts, feelings, or behaviors, they unconsciously revert to identification, a defensive posture where they focus their attention and action on what they primarily identify with, which is, in reality, a substitute for their deeper sense of self. Threes may identify with work, roles, activities, role models and more. Hint: Ask yourself the following questions on a regular basis and particularly when you start to engage in any of the ways in which your tendency to identify with something outside yourself is operating: What do I truly want, not what I should want? What do I really feel, not what I should feel? Where in my body do I experience the answers to these questions? FOURS When Fours feel anxious about their thoughts, feelings, or behaviors, they unconsciously revert to introjection, a defensive posture where they take in only negative responses from others – and these may be only the Four’s interpretations of what occurred – without discerning whether these negative interpretations are accurate or not. Fours also discard positive feedback and interactions. Technically, introjection involves taking in whole both positive and negative feedback without discernment, but Fours use this defense mechanism in the specific way just described. Hint: Spend time with yourself when you have emotional responses, and say this: I am having feelings but I am not my feelings. What are they? Behind these feelings are feelings that are deeper and more accurate. What are they? FIVES When Fives feel anxious about their thoughts, feelings, or behaviors, they unconsciously revert to compartmentalization, a defensive posture where they separate things that would serve them differently – and perhaps better in terms of arriving at their truth emotionally, mentally and instinctually – if they were more connected. There can be a truth from each Center of Intelligence, but the answers can be different and need reconciliation. The truth rarely comes from one center alone. Hint: Move back into your body as often as you can; there are many ways to do this, but it takes practice: breathe into your full body regularly without forcing or pushing your breath; engage in physical activities where you choose to be in your whole body while doing them; feel your legs and your feet, especially where your feet touch the ground and, at the same time, focus your attention in your heart area, allowing your breath to go to this area. SIXES When Sixes feel anxious about their thoughts, feelings, or behaviors, they unconsciously revert to projection, a defensive posture where they imagine something to be true that either has happened, is happening, or might happen. These projections are mental ideas that might be true, might not be true at all, or might be partially true. Hint: To be more truthful, ask yourself some simple questions, especially when you have a strong response: Is this true? How would I know if it is true or not? Does this thinking or interpretation serve me in terms of getting at the truth? Would might serve me better? SEVENS When Sevens feel anxious about their thoughts, feelings, or behaviors, they unconsciously revert to rationalization, a defensive posture where anything Sevens perceive as negative gets reframed in a positive light. This makes getting at the truth near impossible because at least half of reality gets reframed – that is, the negative or that which causes pain. Hint: Notice when you reframe, or you can enlist others to help you notice when you do this. Stop the reframe while you explore what you are truly thinking, feeling or doing underneath the positive reframe. EIGHTS When Eights feel anxious about their thoughts, feelings, or behaviors, they unconsciously revert to denial, a defensive posture where they essentially delete events, people or information that they don’t want to deal with. Essentially, Eights surgically cut out what is part of the whole truth. Hint: When you feel hurt, anxious, vulnerable, highly fearful, or deeply angry, notice how you may move quickly into denial. Stop yourself and say this: What am I feeling? What am I unwilling to look at? What is the whole truth here? NINES When Nines feel anxious about their thoughts, feelings, or behaviors, they unconsciously revert to narcotization, a defensive posture that has them disperse their attention and do something comforting or routine to completely take them away from experiencing and knowing the truth of what is actually occurring. Hint: Notice your favorite ways of distracting and comforting yourself, then stop when you start doing any of these things. Instead, say this to yourself: I deserve to respect myself enough to pay attention to what is occurring inside me: thoughts, feelings, and desired actions. What are they? Ginger Lapid-Bogda PhD, the author of seven best-selling Enneagram-business books, is a speaker, consultant, trainer, and coach. She provides certification programs for professionals around the world who want to bring the Enneagram into organizations with high-impact business applications, and is past-president of the International Enneagram Association. Visit her website: TheEnneagramInBusiness.com. ginger@theenneagraminbusiness.com

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