June 2018

25

Jun'18

Uncovering type thru lucid probing | mistaken identity for Ones

Those of us who want to identify our Enneagram types correctly, as well as those of us who guide others, have a common intention: accuracy! But too often, one phrase or statement reminds us of one of the types in particular. As a result, we end up thinking This is it! A closer examination or inquiry into such statements often reveals a type other than what we first imagined. In this series of 9 blogs, I take one statement we might easily associate with a particular type, but then use a lucid probing technique, which involves two specific questions that uncover the true meaning of the statement. It works like this. First, ask a question to explore the meaning of the statement, rather than making an inference from the statement. Second, explore the underlying drive or motivation beneath the statement. Lucid Probing 1st Explore the meaning of the statement What does_____ mean to you? 2nd Explore the underlying motivation for the statement What causes you to _____? The Statement | “I always work really hard.” This statement sounds like it could be like a type 1 but is it? Yes, Ones work really hard, but so do many other types. Here’s what Ones might say, as well as a sampling of a few other types. Type 1 1st Explore the meaning of the statement What does “always working really hard” mean to you? What a One might say “Working hard means getting everything right, no matter how long it takes. It also means being highly responsible for anything I’ve said I will do.” 2nd Explore the underlying motivation for the statement What causes you to “always work really hard”? What a One might say “I have to get things right. I see errors, mistakes and problems very quickly and have to fix them. I can’t even imagine not doing this.” Yes, the answers appear to suggest this person might a One. However, without the inquiry of Lucid Probing – that is, if the initial statement “always have to work hard” was taken at face value and it was assumed to be a One statement – an unintentional wrong typing identification is possible. Here are some other types that might easily have made the statement “I always work really hard.” The Statement | “I always work really hard.” Type 2 1st Explore the meaning of the statement What does “always working really hard” mean to you? What a Two might say “I always work really hard because I have a terrible time saying ‘no’ when someone asks me to do something. I then get more work than I already have – which is a lot – and feel responsible for getting it all done, even if it is at my own expense.” 2nd Explore the underlying motivation for the statement What causes you to “always work really hard”? What a Two might say “I think of myself as someone who others can count on. This is especially true if it is someone with whom I am close or if it is someone who I simply sense needs a lot of help.” The Statement | “I always work really hard.” Type 3 1st Explore the meaning of the statement What does “always working really hard” mean to you? What a Three might say “I’m always working hard, at home, at work. It’s just what I do. I have a hard time just sitting still and doing nothing.” 2nd Explore the underlying motivation for the statement What causes you to “always work really hard”? What a Three might say “I’ve always worked hard, even in school or sports. I don’t work harder than I need to be successful, but I also don’t know what to do with myself if I’m not working hard and moving forward with some project or task. Being active, creating plans and making things happen seem to be part of my DNA.” The Statement | “I always work really hard.” Type 8 1st Explore the meaning of the statement What does “always working really hard” mean to you? What an Eight might say “I never do anything half-heartedly. I always throw myself into whatever I think is important. Often, but not always, this is work related.” 2nd Explore the underlying motivation for the statement What causes you to “always work really hard”? What an Eight might say “I don’t really know if I like working this hard all the time, but it is what I do. Sometimes it’s because I don’t think I can count on others to step up like I expect. Sometimes it’s because I am just really passionate about most of the things I do. I’m also passionate about my hobbies and go 150% into them.” The above three examples are simply samples. Almost all the Enneagram types might say they “always work really hard,” or at least “work really hard,” but for 9 different reasons! Ginger Lapid-Bogda PhD, the author of seven best-selling Enneagram-business books, is a speaker, consultant, trainer, and coach. She provides certification programs for professionals around the world who want to bring the Enneagram into organizations with high-impact business applications, and is past-president of the International Enneagram Association. Visit her website: TheEnneagramInBusiness.com. ginger@theenneagraminbusiness.com

Read More

18

Jun'18

Insights about Insight by Mary Maddock

In the following blog from Mary Maddock, her insights about insight are applicable to learning the Enneagram, discovering type, training, coaching, consulting, problem solving, and more!  ~ Think about a time when from nowhere, you had a moment of brilliance – an aha or lightbulb moment. Where were you? What were you doing? What did it feel like? When I ask people about their aha experience, most commonly, they say it happens when they least expect it – taking a shower, walking the dog, listening to music, or just as they are waking up from sleep – that is, when they are not thinking about the problem. An aha moment or insight, has two distinct characteristics – with a burst of brain energy the solution comes to you suddenly as a new breakthrough thought, and, instinctively you know the solution to the problem is right. Whilst insights might feel they are random, they are not. The brain is following some predictable processes. Although it is unlikely that we can predict when you will have an insight, you have the ability to foster more of them, if the conditions for the brain are right. Neuroscientists studying Aha moments have revealed there are four conditions that significantly increase the likelihood of stimulating insights. Quiet mind By having a quiet mind, your brain activity level is low, this allows “weak” signals in the brain to be heard, enabling the brain to make new connections by drawing together distantly related information. “Insights require a quiet mind because they themselves are quiet.” (Rock 2011) Inward focused Our attention at any one moment is externally focused. When you focus your attention inward and without the usual day to day distractions, can support the brain by putting into idle mode. This allows the brain to wander and access deeper thinking. Good mood Putting pressure on solving a problem can induce anxiety in the brain, which limits or narrows your perspective. Feeling slightly positive, alters your brain activity to take in a wider range of information which in turn can bring forward new thinking. Switch off Stop thinking about the problem is counter intuitive to how we have traditionally learnt to find a solution. Known as the incubation period, the brain continues to “work on things’ non-consciously and when you focus on unrelated or undemanding tasks, by letting the brain go, it does the work for you. In effect, the brain is simmering to solve. Given insight is a brain friendly way to solve complex problems, how can you create the conditions to have more of them? Mary Maddock is a coach, trainer, consultant and facilitator from Melbourne, Australia e-mail: mary@leadershiftpathways.com.au | website: leadershiftpathways.com.au Ginger Lapid-Bogda PhD, the author of seven best-selling Enneagram-business books, is a speaker, consultant, trainer, and coach. She provides certification programs for professionals around the world who want to bring the Enneagram into organizations with high-impact business applications, and is past-president of the International Enneagram Association. Visit her website: TheEnneagramInBusiness.com. ginger@theenneagraminbusiness.com

Read More

11

Jun'18

What is Enneagram type | Part 6

Type 1 | EGO STRUCTURE Illustrated below is the mental, emotional and behavioral patterns of Enneagram type 1, along with the particular way type 1’s Ego-structure interferes with their spiritual attunement. The Art of Typing | This blog is an adapted excerpt from Ginger Lapid-Bogda’s new book, The Art of Typing: Powerful Tools for Enneagram Typing. In it, you’ll find infographics of the 9 different Enneagram Ego- structures, insightful questions and delightful illustrations to help differentiate between types, and other important factors to consider: overlays such as family, culture and gender, Centers of Intelligence, wings and arrows, Enneagram subtypes, and more. Ginger Lapid-Bogda PhD, the author of seven best-selling Enneagram-business books, is a speaker, consultant, trainer, and coach. She provides certification programs for professionals around the world who want to bring the Enneagram into organizations with high-impact business applications, and is past-president of the International Enneagram Association. Visit her website: TheEnneagramInBusiness.com. ginger@theenneagraminbusiness.com

Read More

04

Jun'18

Development | kindness

No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted. ~ Aesop Kindness has many definitions: empathy, concern, gentleness, and more. Here are ways each enneatype benefits from more kindness. Enneagram Ones For Ones, kindness needs to start with patience, gentleness and acceptance for the self: no harsh recriminations or even mild ones for mistakes made, patience with the pace of self-improvement, and relaxing the pressure to measure up to your own high standards so fervently. Enneagram Twos Twos think of themselves as kind people, so why would kindness be something they would aspire to have more of? Part of their thinking is accurate; Twos can be very kind to people with whom they are close, people who are in need or in dire straits, or people who are important in some way. However, Twos have a dilemma being kind to someone who has wronged them or hurt them or whose character they just don’t like. This is the development stretch for Twos. Enneagram Threes Threes can be kind, although they don’t think about it very much because of their focus on activity, plans and results. The Three’s focus, however, can be what derails their kindness toward both themselves and others. The remedy? Slow down and take in more of what is around you and within you, breathing into your heart area as you do so. This is where kindness originates. Enneagram Fours Fours can be both very kind and unkind to others (if the Four him- or herself is hurting), yet usually less than kind to themselves. Fours tend to blame themselves harshly, perceive themselves as damaged in some way when they feel bad, and more. Kindness needs to start with accepting their own responses, working with these reactions without self-judging or blaming others, and taking a bigger view of the situation, showering themselves with kindness as they do this. Enneagram Fives Fives, like Threes, don’t think that much about kindness although Fives can be quite kind, at least in their thoughts and emotional states. But do they show this kindness outwardly through words and deeds? This is the place of movement. Enneagram Sixes For Sixes, kindness toward self is essential. Why? Because Sixes tend to self-flagellate whenever they think they have done something wrong, even when they haven’t. This specific kind of self-blame relates the Six’s need to be “so good” that if they think they have not been, they then tumble down into feeling “so bad.” Deep loving kindness toward self and under all circumstances is an aspiration worth pursuing. Enneagram Sevens Sevens get so caught up in the glory of ideas – too often bypassing their heart – that kindness can become a mental idea rather than a gentle, heartfelt response. The simple solution to kindness: breath more into your heart and ask yourself how you are feeling on a regular basis. This sets the stage for greater kindness that grows from deep inside the heart. Enneagram Eights Eights can be extremely kind and generous; they can be extreme in many qualities. However, gentle, smaller kindness is something they do less often, although it is something they can learn to cultivate. Here’s how: When you start to initiate a large act of kindness or generosity, stop. Then ask yourself what you are feeling and engage in inquiry about whether this big act moves you away from experiencing your own vulnerability or your own need for kindness. Consider initiating smaller acts of kindness, even semi-invisible acts rather than only big ones. Enneagram Nines Nines are generally quite kind, but are they kind to themselves? What would that look like? One word describes it: self-respect. Honor thyself, be kind to yourself in thought and action; find your voice and use it firmly, clearly, and with kindness. Ginger Lapid-Bogda PhD, the author of seven best-selling Enneagram-business books, is a speaker, consultant, trainer, and coach. She provides certification programs for professionals around the world who want to bring the Enneagram into organizations with high-impact business applications, and is past-president of the International Enneagram Association. Visit her website: TheEnneagramInBusiness.com. ginger@theenneagraminbusiness.com

Read More
© 2020 The Enneagram in Business | All rights reserved.
top
Template Design © VibeThemes. All rights reserved.

Setup Menus in Admin Panel