All posts by Noa-Neus Fuentes Romero

27

Aug'18

Uncovering type thru lucid probing mistaken identity for Fives

Those of us who want to identify our Enneagram types correctly, as well as those of us who guide others, have a common intention: accuracy! But too often, one phrase or statement reminds us of one of the types in particular. As a result, we end up thinking This is it! A closer examination or inquiry into such statements often reveals a type other than what we first imagined. In this series of 9 blogs, I take one statement we might easily associate with a particular type, but then use a lucid probing technique, which involves two specific questions that uncover the true meaning of the statement. It works like this. First, ask a question to explore the meaning of the statement, rather than making an inference from the statement. Second, explore the underlying drive or motivation beneath the statement. Lucid Probing 1st Explore the meaning of the statement What does ____ mean to you? 2nd Explore the underlying motivation for the statement What causes you to _____ ? The Statement | “I don’t like demands being placed on me.” This statement sounds like a type 5, but is it? Yes, Fives intensely dislike demands being placed on them but so do several other types. Here’s what Fives might say, as well as a sampling of a few other types. Type 5 1st Explore the meaning of the statement What does “I don’t like demands being placed on me” mean to you? What a Five might say “It can be just about anything, such as a request for lunch, someone suggesting I should volunteer for a committee that is not part of my actual job description, my partner saying I should go to a certain party.” 2nd Explore the underlying motivation for the statement What causes you to not “like demands being placed on me”? What a Five might say “I have to be careful about how much time and energy I give to others. When someone makes a demand of me, my guard goes up immediately. If I say yes to this, what else will they expect later. One thing leads to another easily, so I am very watchful about these things.” Yes, the answers appear to suggest this person might be an Enneagram Five. However, without the inquiry of Lucid Probing – that is, if the initial statement “I don’t like demands being placed on me” was taken at face value and it was assumed to be a Five statement – an unintentional wrong typing identification is possible. Here are some other types that might easily have made the statement “I don’t like demands being placed on me.” The Statement | “I don’t like demands being placed on me.” Type 9 1st Explore the meaning of the statement What does “I don’t like demands being placed on me” mean to you? What a Nine might say “I don’t like it when people have a lot of demands, expectations. I don’t think people should be that way. Demands feel pushy and I don’t do that to others. If I want something from someone, I ask nicely and respectfully.” 2nd Explore the underlying motivation for the statement What causes you to not “like demands being placed on me”? What a Nine might say “Really, it feels like pressure to me and I do not like pressure. It makes me feel tense. And if the demands are too much, I can start to get angry. Demands feel like control.” The Statement | “I don’t like demands being placed on me.” Type 8 1st Explore the meaning of the statement What does “I don’t like demands being placed on me” mean to you? What an Eight might say “No one really makes demands on me, but if they try, I get angry. I place a lot of demands on myself, and some say I can be demanding of others, but people don’t place demands on me very often.” 2nd Explore the underlying motivation for the statement What causes you to not “like demands being placed on me”? What an Eight might say “I honestly don’t think people are entitled to place demands on me except in very specific situations. Generally, I am in control of what I do, when I do and even how I do it. And I like it that way. If someone did try, I’d get angry and let them know it. Maybe it’s that I like to be in control of everything, especially me and my time.” The Statement | “I don’t like demands being placed on me.” Type 2 1st Explore the meaning of the statement What does “I don’t like demands being placed on me” mean to you? What a Two might say “I really don’t like demands at all. In fact, I bristle when that’s what I think someone is doing. What I’m thinking is ’How dare they!’ I can also start feeling guilty if the demand is something I should have seen coming and done something about, and I somehow missed it. Then I feel bad about it.” 2nd Explore the underlying motivation for the statement What causes you to not “like demands being placed on me”? What a Two might say “For me it’s pretty clear. I do so much for others and usually I want to. So why would someone place demands on me? Why not ask me instead? Why not just let me see what’s needed and see how I can support the effort.” The above three examples are simply samples. Many Enneagram types might say they “I don’t like demands being places on me,” but their reasons would be different! Ginger Lapid-Bogda PhD, the author of seven best-selling Enneagram-business books, is a speaker, consultant, trainer, and coach. She provides certification programs for professionals around the world who want to bring the Enneagram into organizations with high-impact business applications, and is past-president of the International Enneagram Association. Visit her website: TheEnneagramInBusiness.com. ginger@theenneagraminbusiness.com

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20

Aug'18

Most common reasons for mistyping | Part 2

In the first blog of this series, the first five main reasons for mistyping were covered: insufficient knowledge of the Enneagram: misunderstood, old or incorrect concepts; focusing on what and not why; lack of self-awareness; and subtypes. This second blog reviews five additional reasons why mistyping occurs. Primary reliance on tests There are so many methods for helping people identify type, tests among them. Of course, some tests are better than other tests, but even the best tests do not identify type 100% accurately. If the person taking the test does not have a well-qualified outside source of guidance in terms of the accuracy of the test’s results, mistyping is the result. Trauma Big trauma can cover someone’s real type for so many reasons. If a person is still traumatized, their self-awareness may be low and their current behavior may not reflect their true type. In a sense, this person may be at a low-self-mastery level where it is more difficult to see type accurately. High self-mastery individuals, although they may not exhibit type in obvious ways, are usually self-aware enough, with the proper guidance, to determine their type accurately. Overlays (family, culture) Overlays can be country, culture, family, and more. At first glance, for example, a person from France, which is a type Four culture, may perceive themselves as a Four because the French culture is extremely strong. Family overlays happen enough to be a factor, although not everyone has a family type overlay. In my own family, for example, my mother was a 6 and father a 5. Our 6 mother had a far more dominant influence on the family, so both my brother and I have this overlay. He’s a 6 himself, so this overlay has intensified his 6ness. For me as a 2, the impact is I am more tuned into other people’s agendas and do engage in anticipatory scenario planning, although not as strongly or as long as a 6. In addition, my scenario thinking goes to worst-case and best-case. Teachers telling type Many Enneagram teachers tell people under their guidance what there types are, even if these teachers don’t realize they are doing so. They might say, “You’re not this type, you’re that type” and mean the statement as an opinion rather than a definitive answer. Or they may say, “Based on this and that, you're this particular type.” People who want to discover their type often look to teachers to tell them or confirm their type, and often hear a teacher’s suggestion as a statement of fact. In addition, some Enneagram teachers think it is their job and role to tell people their type. These teachers do believe they are accurate in their assessments. The problem is that they can be wrong, but they may tell people in such an authoritative way that people under their guidance may look no further. Teachers not guiding to clarification of type Some Enneagram teachers believe it is absolutely wrong to give any indication of a person’s type, even when people have come to them for guidance. While self-exploration is admirable and guiding people in this direction can be an art form, it can also leave individuals incorrectly typed or not finding their type for a very long time, longer than is really necessary. Some say, “If they get their type wrong, it’s Ok because they’ll figure it out eventually.” The issue here is this: is it really OK to let people think they are a type they are not, engage in the related development work, and then find that they’ve made little progress because their type is incorrectly identified? Summary The issue of how much to tell and how much to guide is important to everyone who is in a position to support others in using the Enneagram in their lives. Too much telling, and types can be wrong and the self-exploration is diminished. Too little guidance is like wandering in the desert without water, when the watering hole is just within reach. Ginger Lapid-Bogda PhD, the author of seven best-selling Enneagram-business books, is a speaker, consultant, trainer, and coach. She provides certification programs for professionals around the world who want to bring the Enneagram into organizations with high-impact business applications, and is past-president of the International Enneagram Association. Visit her website: TheEnneagramInBusiness.com. ginger@theenneagraminbusiness.com

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13

Aug'18

Most common reasons for mistyping | Part 1

The Enneagram is more than a personality system. In fact, it isn’t really a personality system because personality refers to behaviors and traits that are persistent and measurable. Enneagram type is far more than behavior and traits. Enneagram type includes many other factors such as drives and motivation, patterns of thinking, feeling and behaving and more. If the nine types were personality, these measurable behaviors and traits would also need to be unique to each type. And they are not! Several types exhibit very similar behaviors and traits, but for different reasons. The nine types actually represent nine distinct aspects of the human ego. Getting your type ‘right’ is essential given that deep psychological and spiritual development is directly connected to type. From my experience training professionals who work with the Enneagram, here are five of the 10 key reasons people get their types wrong. Insufficient knowledge of the Enneagram People who are trying to self-type or people trying to type others simply do not have the knowledge base and skills to do this effectively. The Enneagram is not a simple system, it is a dynamic one with multiple layers. Misunderstood, old or incorrect concepts Some people have typed themselves or been typed decades ago when many aspects of the modern usage of Enneagram were not fully uncovered, not that we aren’t still learning more about the types and the system. Or perhaps someone learned the Enneagram recently, but was using an older book or learning from someone who had learned it long ago, perhaps incompletely. Focusing on what and not why For newcomers, this is the biggest issue related to mis-identification of type. People focus on specific behaviors – for example, “Which type works hard?” or “Which type cares about what people think of them?” These questions fall into the category of what, and what will never get to accurate typing. The key thing that matters is the why behind the what. Why does a person work hard or why do they care what others think. Lack of self-awareness If a person is not very self-aware, it is very difficult for them to answer questions accurately about themselves. Their self-inquiry is stunted and limited, making accurate typing challenging. Subtypes While subtypes – the three versions of each type based on the catalytic intersection of the most activated basic instinct and the type’s passion – are not new to the Enneagram, we are learning more and more about them. Many of the subtypes can be easily confused with another type, so without sufficient subtype knowledge, mistyping occurs. The second part of this blog covers the remaining five reasons for mistyping. Primary reliance on tests Trauma Overlays (family, culture) Teachers telling type Teachers not guiding Ginger Lapid-Bogda PhD, the author of seven best-selling Enneagram-business books, is a speaker, consultant, trainer, and coach. She provides certification programs for professionals around the world who want to bring the Enneagram into organizations with high-impact business applications, and is past-president of the International Enneagram Association. Visit her website: TheEnneagramInBusiness.com. ginger@theenneagraminbusiness.com

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06

Aug'18

Development | be wild and wacky

“Genius means little more than the faculty of perceiving in an unhabitual way.” ~ William James Enneagram Ones Do something spontaneous and do it where others can see you. And you can’t plan being spontaneous. Go somewhere and just be spontaneous. How’s that? Enneagram Twos Cook a really good meal just for yourself. And if you don’t cook, though many twos like to cook, order yourself a simply delicious take-out meal, just for you. Order what you want, without regard to anyone else. Enneagram Threes Let yourself look sloppy for 1 full day and go somewhere where others can see you. Do you dare to do this? This doesn’t mean looking casual; it means sloppy, sloppy, sloppy. Find the pleasure in this. Enneagram Fours Breathe into your toes. Breath into your whole body instead of breathing primarily into your chest area as Fours normally do. When you get to your toes, wiggle them and laugh! Enneagram Fives Let someone give you a hug. Even better, ask someone for a hug. Be in your heart when you ask; be in your body when you receive. Enneagram Sixes Sing yourself a happy song inside your head. Any song will do; keep singing it repeatedly over the day. Let yourself have fun being silly. Enneagram Sevens Can you talk without using your hands? This is a big challenge for the normally animated Sevens. Can you do it? Hmmmm. What happens? Enneagram Eights Be a child for a day. Do fun things. Many Eights feel they’ve always had to be a grown-up. Take a day to be a child in the best sense of the word. Take along a “playmate” if you like. Or do it by yourself. Enneagram Nines Scream in a safe place. Find a safe place and practice some screaming, for example, when driving in a car near a fire truck or police car that has a siren on. Roll up the windows and enjoy the scream. Laugh about it. Ginger Lapid-Bogda PhD, the author of seven best-selling Enneagram-business books, is a speaker, consultant, trainer, and coach. She provides certification programs for professionals around the world who want to bring the Enneagram into organizations with high-impact business applications, and is past-president of the International Enneagram Association. Visit her website: TheEnneagramInBusiness.com. ginger@theenneagraminbusiness.com

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17

Jul'18

Uncovering type thru lucid probing | mistaken identity for Threes

Those of us who want to identify our Enneagram types correctly, as well as those of us who guide others, have a common intention: accuracy! But too often, one phrase or statement reminds us of one of the types in particular. As a result, we end up thinking This is it! A closer examination or inquiry into such statements often reveals a type other than what we first imagined. In this series of 9 blogs, I take one statement we might easily associate with a particular type, but then use a lucid probing technique, which involves two specific questions that uncover the true meaning of the statement. It works like this. First, ask a question to explore the meaning of the statement, rather than making an inference from the statement. Second, explore the underlying drive or motivation beneath the statement. Lucid Probing 1st Explore the meaning of the statement What does _____ mean to you? 2nd Explore the underlying motivation for the statement What causes you to _____ ? The Statement | “I’m extremely impatient.” This statement sounds like a type 3, but is it? Yes, Threes can be extremely impatient but so are many other types. Here’s what Threes might say, as well as a sampling of a few other types. Type 3 1st Explore the meaning of the statement What does “I’m extremely impatient” mean to you? What a Three might say “I’m not always impatient, but I can be extremely impatient, especially when I get frustrated or dissatisfied with how something is going. I can also be extremely impatient with people when they take too long to get to the point or they waste my time in some way.” 2nd Explore the underlying motivation for the statement What causes you to become “extremely impatient”? What a Three might say “I just said this. I can’t stand having my time wasted. I don’t like it when things take longer than they should or when people talk on and on when they could get to the point more quickly. I also become impatient when I have work to do and something or someone wastes my time.” Yes, the answers appear to suggest this person might an Enneagram Three. However, without the inquiry of Lucid Probing – that is, if the initial statement “I’m extremely impatient” was taken at face value and it was assumed to be a Three statement – an unintentional wrong typing identification is possible. Here are some other types that might easily have made the statement “I’m extremely impatient.” The Statement | “I’m extremely impatient.” Type 1 1st Explore the meaning of the statement What does “I’m extremely impatient” mean to you? What a One might say “I get impatient easily; perhaps irritated is a better word to describe my reactions. I get irritated and impatient with people who make mistakes without checking them and, then, either I or they have to redo them. Why not get it right the first time? I also get impatient when people put forth ideas that have no thought behind them. I also get impatient and irritated when people break the rules, like parking in a disabled park spot when the person clearly has no disability.” 2nd Explore the underlying motivation for the statement What causes you to be “extremely impatient.” What a One might say “I’ll have to think more about this. I think it relates to people not being respectful of other people and their time, not having high enough standards that they think good enough is good enough. I have high standards and expectations.” The Statement | “I’m extremely impatient.” Type 5 1st Explore the meaning of the statement What does “I’m extremely impatient” mean to you? What a Five might say “It means I don’t like something and I get annoyed by it.” 2nd Explore the underlying motivation for the statement What causes you to be “extremely impatient.” What a Five might say “I like to work with smart people who do smart things. I become extremely impatient with people who are not logical and who take up too much time just talking but not going anywhere. I also get impatient when people talk about or demand conversations about emotions that go on way too long. What’s the point, and it’s tiring.” The Statement | “I’m extremely impatient.” Type 8 1st Explore the meaning of the statement What does “I’m extremely impatient” mean to you? What an Eight might say “It means I want it over and done with now. With some things and people I am highly impatient; in other cases, I have a great deal of patience.” 2nd Explore the underlying motivation for the statement What causes you to be “extremely impatient.” What an Eight might say “I like things to happen in a big way and don’t like being inundated with details. I get impatient with this. I also don’t like being around people who don’t take their responsibilities seriously or who don’t take responsibility for their own behavior and performance.” The above three examples are simply samples. Many Enneagram types might say “I’m extremely impatient,” but their reasons would be different! Ginger Lapid-Bogda PhD, the author of seven best-selling Enneagram-business books, is a speaker, consultant, trainer, and coach. She provides certification programs for professionals around the world who want to bring the Enneagram into organizations with high-impact business applications, and is past-president of the International Enneagram Association. Visit her website: TheEnneagramInBusiness.com. ginger@theenneagraminbusiness.com

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09

Jul'18

Uncovering type thru lucid probing | mistaken identity for Twos

Those of us who want to identify our Enneagram types correctly, as well as those of us who guide others, have a common intention: accuracy! But too often, one phrase or statement reminds us of one of the types in particular. As a result, we end up thinking This is it! A closer examination or inquiry into such statements often reveals a type other than what we first imagined. In this series of 9 blogs, I take one statement we might easily associate with a particular type, but then use a lucid probing technique, which involves two specific questions that uncover the true meaning of the statement. It works like this. First, ask a question to explore the meaning of the statement, rather than making an inference from the statement. Second, explore the underlying drive or motivation beneath the statement. Lucid Probing 1st Explore the meaning of the statement What does ____ mean to you? 2nd Explore the underlying motivation for the statement What causes you to ____ ? The Statement | “I care a lot about what people think.” This statement sounds like a type 2, but is it? Yes, Twos care a lot about what people think, but so do many other types. Here’s what Twos might say, as well as a sampling of a few other types. Type 2 1st Explore the meaning of the statement What does “care a lot about what people think” mean to you? What a Two might say “I always care what people think, at least most of the time. I pay a lot of attention to people, what they might need, how they will respond to what I am saying or doing. I don’t care about what everyone thinks, but I do care about many, many people. I just tune into others naturally.” 2nd Explore the underlying motivation for the statement What causes you to “care a lot about what people think”? What a Two might say “I’ve always done this. When I do something in my personal life, I consider the impact on others and immediately notice their responses. At work, it is the same. I can tell almost intuitively how someone is or how someone will respond. How people respond to me affects me pretty instantly and often deeply.” Yes, the answers appear to suggest this person might an Enneagram Two. However, without the inquiry of Lucid Probing – that is, if the initial statement “I care a lot about what people think” was taken at face value and it was assumed to be a Two statement – an unintentional wrong typing identification is possible. Here are some other types that might easily have made the statement “I care a lot about what people think.” The Statement | “I care a lot about what people think.” Type 4 1st Explore the meaning of the statement What does “care a lot about what people think” mean to you? What a Four might say “I almost always care about what others think. I also care how they feel. Feelings are essential to our being human so paying attention to this in ourselves and others is essential.” 2nd Explore the underlying motivation for the statement What causes you to “care a lot about what people think”? What a Four might say “Doesn’t everyone care about what people think? Or, at least they should. Sometimes I care too much in the sense that I am often highly sensitive to how others are reacting to me and have a tendency to feel the negative more than the positive and to absorb a negative response.” The Statement | “I care a lot about what people think.” Type 6 1st Explore the meaning of the statement What does “care a lot about what people think” mean to you? What a Six might say “You have to pay attention to what other people think. I often think I know what people are thinking, but sometimes I’m not sure. I also want to know where I stand with others, and even if it’s working on a problem, more minds – especially good minds – can often arrive at a better outcome.” 2nd Explore the underlying motivation for the statement What causes you to “care a lot about what people think”? What a Six might say “You have to know what’s on the minds of others if you are working with them to figure out what is the best way to approach something. At home, it’s the same. Even better is if they share what they are thinking, although I’m pretty good at figuring it out.” The Statement | “I care a lot about what people think.” Type 7 1st Explore the meaning of the statement What does “care a lot about what people think” mean to you? What a Seven might say “Of course I care, although I can get wrapped up in my own thoughts, but I want to know what others are thinking.” 2nd Explore the underlying motivation for the statement What causes you to “care a lot about what people think”? What a Seven might say “If I am giving a speech or planning to do something that involves others, I definitely want to know. I am not sure how good I am at knowing, but I do try. Sometimes I can almost read other people’s minds; other times, I just can’t quite tell what they are thinking. But I do care.” The above three examples are simply samples. Many Enneagram types might say they “I care a lot about what people think,” but their reasons would be different! Ginger Lapid-Bogda PhD, the author of seven best-selling Enneagram-business books, is a speaker, consultant, trainer, and coach. She provides certification programs for professionals around the world who want to bring the Enneagram into organizations with high-impact business applications, and is past-president of the International Enneagram Association. Visit her website: TheEnneagramInBusiness.com. ginger@theenneagraminbusiness.com

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02

Jul'18

Development | being in reality

“I think, to me, reality is better than being fake.” ~ Ice Cube We are all “fake” or false in some respects and don’t even know this, particularly when our enneatype structure distorts our reality. Here are some of the ways: Enneagram Ones | false perfection As Ones pursue perfection – at least as they understand it in daily life – they perceive that so much is not as it should be and so they must make it right. But this notion is the opposite of what true perfection is and what reality is. In other words, in reality and true perfection, what is is. It is the acceptance of this reality that is actually perfection in its finest form. Learn to accept what is. Enneagram Twos | false abundance Twos live in a false reality where resources are never-ending, people are all good ¬until they are not, and the disappointment of not living in this embellished reality of false abundance is huge. People disappoint, resources dry up, and people suffer. Learn to live in a more balanced reality: good and bad simultaneously; joy and suffering as part of a complete whole; and reverence for each resource provided and used. Enneagram Threes | false image Threes live in a world of false images – for example, their own image, other people’s images, what they should want rather than what they do want, and how they think they should act rather than how they would behave if they were more spontaneous. At the same time, many Threes crave truth and honesty, and one way of understanding this is that they thirst for what they don’t have. Learn to be more honest with yourself first and then others. Find your heart’s desire. Enneagram Fours | false connection Fours so deeply desire the deepest level of connection with themselves and others that they can mistake intensity for connection. In addition, Fours define connection as primarily emotional, rather than physical or mental, which are two additional and equally viable ways of establishing connection. With an unnecessarily narrow path to connection, no wonder Fours both crave and feel deprived of it. Find multiple ways of connecting and also learn to trust that what goes away – nothing is permanent – comes around in another form. Enneagram Fives | false scarcity Fives live in a reality of false scarcity, the idea that there is not and will not be enough to go around. With this belief in mind, Fives keep themselves in an autonomous state, rarely relying on outside resources and conserving their own energy. The belief, then, becomes a self-fulfilling reality. No wonder Fives become depleted and drained. Fives can try to change this mind-set, but that is difficult. Try a change of behavior instead, by relying on others more and asking on occasion for what is needed. Small steps lead to bigger ones. Enneagram Sixes | false complexity Sixes may not want to hear this, but the world is not nearly so complex as they might think. What if the world is simpler, yet equally – and differently – meaningful and profound. The idea is not to believe all your thoughts, just believe some of them. Which ones? Believe the ideas that are simpler but not simplistic, profound yet powerful, and self-supporting rather than self-limiting. Enneagram Sevens | false freedom Sevens want no constraints so they can feel free. They want every option available so they can feel free. They want no one to reign them in or to say no to them so they can feel free. They want to do whatever they want whenever they want so they can feel free. What if this isn’t freedom at all, but false freedom? What if freedom is the ability to choose a course and stay committed to it, out of choice and freedom? Enneagram Eights | false strength Eights know a lot about strength; it is what they rely on most. However, Eights define strength as toughness and certitude at all times, and almost never letting your guard down or showing any vulnerability, even to those with whom they are close. Real strength, however, comes from being vulnerable, working with those areas that might need development – such as hurt and grief – and allowing others to be in support. True strength is achieved through strength and vulnerability and strength through vulnerability. Try it! Enneagram Nines | false humility Nines appear humble. However, some Nines are truly humble and others are not. Their humility may actually be self-deprecation, but it can also be masked ambition or ambition thwarted. It can be personal and social power unacknowledged or unused. Nines, to avoid false humility, can step into themselves, stand tall, and speak with their deepest voice. All will hear. Ginger Lapid-Bogda PhD, the author of seven best-selling Enneagram-business books, is a speaker, consultant, trainer, and coach. She provides certification programs for professionals around the world who want to bring the Enneagram into organizations with high-impact business applications, and is past-president of the International Enneagram Association. Visit her website: TheEnneagramInBusiness.com. ginger@theenneagraminbusiness.com

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25

Jun'18

Uncovering type thru lucid probing | mistaken identity for Ones

Those of us who want to identify our Enneagram types correctly, as well as those of us who guide others, have a common intention: accuracy! But too often, one phrase or statement reminds us of one of the types in particular. As a result, we end up thinking This is it! A closer examination or inquiry into such statements often reveals a type other than what we first imagined. In this series of 9 blogs, I take one statement we might easily associate with a particular type, but then use a lucid probing technique, which involves two specific questions that uncover the true meaning of the statement. It works like this. First, ask a question to explore the meaning of the statement, rather than making an inference from the statement. Second, explore the underlying drive or motivation beneath the statement. Lucid Probing 1st Explore the meaning of the statement What does_____ mean to you? 2nd Explore the underlying motivation for the statement What causes you to _____? The Statement | “I always work really hard.” This statement sounds like it could be like a type 1 but is it? Yes, Ones work really hard, but so do many other types. Here’s what Ones might say, as well as a sampling of a few other types. Type 1 1st Explore the meaning of the statement What does “always working really hard” mean to you? What a One might say “Working hard means getting everything right, no matter how long it takes. It also means being highly responsible for anything I’ve said I will do.” 2nd Explore the underlying motivation for the statement What causes you to “always work really hard”? What a One might say “I have to get things right. I see errors, mistakes and problems very quickly and have to fix them. I can’t even imagine not doing this.” Yes, the answers appear to suggest this person might a One. However, without the inquiry of Lucid Probing – that is, if the initial statement “always have to work hard” was taken at face value and it was assumed to be a One statement – an unintentional wrong typing identification is possible. Here are some other types that might easily have made the statement “I always work really hard.” The Statement | “I always work really hard.” Type 2 1st Explore the meaning of the statement What does “always working really hard” mean to you? What a Two might say “I always work really hard because I have a terrible time saying ‘no’ when someone asks me to do something. I then get more work than I already have – which is a lot – and feel responsible for getting it all done, even if it is at my own expense.” 2nd Explore the underlying motivation for the statement What causes you to “always work really hard”? What a Two might say “I think of myself as someone who others can count on. This is especially true if it is someone with whom I am close or if it is someone who I simply sense needs a lot of help.” The Statement | “I always work really hard.” Type 3 1st Explore the meaning of the statement What does “always working really hard” mean to you? What a Three might say “I’m always working hard, at home, at work. It’s just what I do. I have a hard time just sitting still and doing nothing.” 2nd Explore the underlying motivation for the statement What causes you to “always work really hard”? What a Three might say “I’ve always worked hard, even in school or sports. I don’t work harder than I need to be successful, but I also don’t know what to do with myself if I’m not working hard and moving forward with some project or task. Being active, creating plans and making things happen seem to be part of my DNA.” The Statement | “I always work really hard.” Type 8 1st Explore the meaning of the statement What does “always working really hard” mean to you? What an Eight might say “I never do anything half-heartedly. I always throw myself into whatever I think is important. Often, but not always, this is work related.” 2nd Explore the underlying motivation for the statement What causes you to “always work really hard”? What an Eight might say “I don’t really know if I like working this hard all the time, but it is what I do. Sometimes it’s because I don’t think I can count on others to step up like I expect. Sometimes it’s because I am just really passionate about most of the things I do. I’m also passionate about my hobbies and go 150% into them.” The above three examples are simply samples. Almost all the Enneagram types might say they “always work really hard,” or at least “work really hard,” but for 9 different reasons! Ginger Lapid-Bogda PhD, the author of seven best-selling Enneagram-business books, is a speaker, consultant, trainer, and coach. She provides certification programs for professionals around the world who want to bring the Enneagram into organizations with high-impact business applications, and is past-president of the International Enneagram Association. Visit her website: TheEnneagramInBusiness.com. ginger@theenneagraminbusiness.com

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18

Jun'18

Insights about Insight by Mary Maddock

In the following blog from Mary Maddock, her insights about insight are applicable to learning the Enneagram, discovering type, training, coaching, consulting, problem solving, and more!  ~ Think about a time when from nowhere, you had a moment of brilliance – an aha or lightbulb moment. Where were you? What were you doing? What did it feel like? When I ask people about their aha experience, most commonly, they say it happens when they least expect it – taking a shower, walking the dog, listening to music, or just as they are waking up from sleep – that is, when they are not thinking about the problem. An aha moment or insight, has two distinct characteristics – with a burst of brain energy the solution comes to you suddenly as a new breakthrough thought, and, instinctively you know the solution to the problem is right. Whilst insights might feel they are random, they are not. The brain is following some predictable processes. Although it is unlikely that we can predict when you will have an insight, you have the ability to foster more of them, if the conditions for the brain are right. Neuroscientists studying Aha moments have revealed there are four conditions that significantly increase the likelihood of stimulating insights. Quiet mind By having a quiet mind, your brain activity level is low, this allows “weak” signals in the brain to be heard, enabling the brain to make new connections by drawing together distantly related information. “Insights require a quiet mind because they themselves are quiet.” (Rock 2011) Inward focused Our attention at any one moment is externally focused. When you focus your attention inward and without the usual day to day distractions, can support the brain by putting into idle mode. This allows the brain to wander and access deeper thinking. Good mood Putting pressure on solving a problem can induce anxiety in the brain, which limits or narrows your perspective. Feeling slightly positive, alters your brain activity to take in a wider range of information which in turn can bring forward new thinking. Switch off Stop thinking about the problem is counter intuitive to how we have traditionally learnt to find a solution. Known as the incubation period, the brain continues to “work on things’ non-consciously and when you focus on unrelated or undemanding tasks, by letting the brain go, it does the work for you. In effect, the brain is simmering to solve. Given insight is a brain friendly way to solve complex problems, how can you create the conditions to have more of them? Mary Maddock is a coach, trainer, consultant and facilitator from Melbourne, Australia e-mail: mary@leadershiftpathways.com.au | website: leadershiftpathways.com.au Ginger Lapid-Bogda PhD, the author of seven best-selling Enneagram-business books, is a speaker, consultant, trainer, and coach. She provides certification programs for professionals around the world who want to bring the Enneagram into organizations with high-impact business applications, and is past-president of the International Enneagram Association. Visit her website: TheEnneagramInBusiness.com. ginger@theenneagraminbusiness.com

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11

Jun'18

What is Enneagram type | Part 6

Type 1 | EGO STRUCTURE Illustrated below is the mental, emotional and behavioral patterns of Enneagram type 1, along with the particular way type 1’s Ego-structure interferes with their spiritual attunement. The Art of Typing | This blog is an adapted excerpt from Ginger Lapid-Bogda’s new book, The Art of Typing: Powerful Tools for Enneagram Typing. In it, you’ll find infographics of the 9 different Enneagram Ego- structures, insightful questions and delightful illustrations to help differentiate between types, and other important factors to consider: overlays such as family, culture and gender, Centers of Intelligence, wings and arrows, Enneagram subtypes, and more. Ginger Lapid-Bogda PhD, the author of seven best-selling Enneagram-business books, is a speaker, consultant, trainer, and coach. She provides certification programs for professionals around the world who want to bring the Enneagram into organizations with high-impact business applications, and is past-president of the International Enneagram Association. Visit her website: TheEnneagramInBusiness.com. ginger@theenneagraminbusiness.com

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